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The morning light might cloak the freckles of the stars in the night sky, but a glimmer of hope remains for stargazers and daydreamers who wish to keep nature’s gems to themselves. In an astonishing turn of events, haute horologer Roger Dubuis has caught a shooting star and captured it as an everlasting timepiece in the form of its Excalibur Single Flying Tourbillon Shooting Star watch.

Inspired by the original X42 tourbillon, the watchmaker set off on a journey to create a beautiful yet empowering pièce de résistance for the Roger Dubuis woman, whose grit and poise outshines others. Tailored for lithe wrists, this limited-edition watch’s case is an impressive 36mm, making it one of the smallest flying tourbillons to ever exist.

The bewitching watch ticks with a selfwinding mechanical calibre and a 60-hour power reserve. Composed of 179 parts, its RD510SQ skeleton has the bearings of a Poinçon de Genève-certified watch, a pride it has always been known for.

Reimagining the Roger Dubuis woman in different lights, the watch comes in white, pink, and blue, all of which capture the stars’ complexity in their own ways. This Excalibur wouldn’t shine as bright without the round-cut diamonds and coloured enamel stars perched on artistically moulded 18K white gold or pink gold that form the shooting star centrepiece.

Supporting the striking skeleton is a pink gold or blue PVD flange, which also uses 10 round diamonds as the hour indicators. Encircling the magnetic piece are a bejewelled white gold or pink gold bezel latched onto delicate alligator straps and an adjustable folding buckle. With just eight pieces made for each colour, this timepiece is a gift few can even dream of possessing. From the haute horologer’s hand to the wearer’s, Roger Dubuis’ Excalibur Single Flying Tourbillon Shooting Star compels women to be the interstellar wonders that they truly are.

See Also: Roger Dubuis Limited Edition Excalibur Aventador S Pays Tribute To Japanese Culture

Tags: Watches, Roger Dubuis, December 2018 Issue